Effects and Impact

This exhibit contains pages from articles showcasing the women’s suffrage movement's impact after August 18th, 1920, when the 19th Amendment gave women the right to vote. After decades of protest from suffragettes, women were finally given the right to vote in the U.S., which is seen in one of the article headlines from The Times, discussing the passing of the amendment. The article from The Times of May 5th, 1966, reports that although women have been given more rights, there is a new fight for economic equality. The article discusses how women are just as capable as men but are discriminated against, underestimated, and confined to jobs or roles that are more considered suitable for them by society. Additionally, there is a gap between the pay that men receive compared to women. In July 1978, there was the largest women’s rights demonstration of the time in Seattle on Capitol Hill, with a turnout of 100,000. 

In the 21st century, although women have more opportunities than they have in the past, there is still work that needs to be put toward gender parity. The Times issue for June 15th, 2004, discusses discrimination that women lawyers and other professional occupations face. In 2012, the equal pay ruling allowed women to take their employers to court for unequal compensation. An article from The Independent in 2015, discusses the film ‘Suffragette’ and how it portrays the successes of feminism, but also what still needs to be progressed on. The article mentions issues such as discrimination there is within feminism against people of color, where women of color are not properly represented or their issues that come from both color and gender are addressed. Despite the great progression feminism has made since the first suffragettes, there is still advancement that needs to be made toward gender equality. 

Effects and Impact